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.n. as the obama administration explanation of the attack in benghazi continues to einvolve this morning. secretary of state hillary clinton suggesting in a gathering of world leaders that the attack was the work of an al qaeda affiliate. the secretary saying this. now with a larger safe haven and increased freedom to maneuver, terrorists are seeking to extend their reach and networks in multiple directions. they're working with other violent extremists to undermined the democratic transitions underway in north africa as we tragically saw in benghazi. that is the first time secretary clinton acknowledged al qaeda as possibly playing a role in that attack. we'll have more on that coming up. a group of senators are now demanding that susan rice, america's ambassador to the u.n., provide more answers what happened in benghazi. new hampshire senator, kelly ayotte one of those four senators who sent a scathing letter to ambassador susan rice, she will be here to tell us first-hand what that is all about. bill: meantime the violence in syria getting worse by the day. a pair of massive explosions rocking
.s. personnel have been evacuated from benghazi, libya. and very small skeletal staffs in tripoli and also yemen. but the u.s. is also looking at other countries. we have ten countries that you just mentioned where there are u.s. protests. clearly they're looking at sudan right now. right now they're not evacuating people. again, they're saying stay tuned. make sure you're registered with the embassy. right now everyone's relying on commercial travel to get out. the roads are open. everything's open, wolf. right now it's just seems to be localized just at these u.s. embassies and not kind of chaos spreading throughout the country. >> these are live pictures we're showing our viewers now from tahrir square in cairo. not very far from the u.s. embassy. you've been there, i've been there. it's only a few -- maybe a block away. but they have apparently established all sorts of barriers around the u.s. embassy. it's a huge embassy too. >> it's a huge embassy. it's like a complex, if you will. even as you have the setback in these reinforcements, they're asking the local government in the last couple
. they were killed at or around the u.s. consulate in benghazi. this is the eastern side of libya. this happened overnight. stevens was a career diplomat. spent several stints in libya. the type of dedicate the american diplomat we come across all the time in that region. secretary clint said he was committed to america's values and interests. this was all about attack on the consulate by islamists protesting the film made in the united states critical of the muslim prophet mohammed. getting a lot of play on the internet. consulate burned down the vehicles perhaps the one in which the ambassador and other americans were hit by rockets. we heard from the leadership of the libyan government. they say they are sorry that they are looking for those responsible. one group being now thought as a possible suspect with allegiances to al qaeda but there are a lot of militant groups as we can tell you from our experience on the ground in libya in post-qaddafi era. bill: what can we report about what is happening in the region today, greg? >> reporter: seems like the chronology, bill, this w
with the benghazi demonstration. as the investigation moves forward, hundreds of protesters in yemen chanted death to america. bill: in tune, further the west, protesters gathering outside the american embassy waving black islamic flags, chanting anti-american slogans and pictures of usama bin laden. jennifer griffin is the at pentagon. let's start in london with greg palkot on the ground in yemen. what is the latest being reported there, greg? >> reporter: we've been to the embassy a few times. we've been talking to our contacts on the grand there in sanaa, yemen. we believe the situation is calm around the u.s. embassy. it was anything but earlier today. i'm told thousands of protesters gathered outside of the building and some of those managed to get their way in. at least to scale the perimeter wall. to break you there the main gate to enter the security building to get into the compound before the main embassy building. they torched cars, smashed windows and stole equipment. the security guards tried to hold them off. fired shots in the area. that didn't work. yemeni security forces came in,
states. at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya's second largest city, at least one american staff member was killed after gunmen stormed the compound and burned it down. we've got some amateur video here into nbc news from the scene. if you listen, you can hear gunshots going off in the background. witnesses say the attackers were armed with automatic rifles, rpgs. libyan forces stationed there said to have little to stop the violence. >>> in neighboring cairo, angry protesters scaled the fortified walls of the u.s. embassy, destroyed the american flag and replaced it with a black islamic banner. most of the u.s. diplomatic staff had already been evacuated in anticipation of this protest. both incidents reportedly are reaction to a little-known amateur movie produced in the united states which ridiculed the prophet mohammed. it gained attention because an obscure florida pastor began promoting it, the same man who triggered deadly riots in afghanistan when he threatened to burn the koran. we want to go straight to cairo where we find nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel.
in cairo. as a consequence of the video. our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was in fact initially a spontaneous reaction to what transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo, which were prompted of course by the video. what our assessment is as of the present is in fact what it began spontaneously in benghazi, as a reaction to what had transpired some hours earlier in cairo. megyn: joining me now, simon rosenberg, president and founder of ndn think tank and former advisor to president clinton. mark these send, fellow at american enterprise institute and former speechwriter for president george w. bush. mark, what the intel services are telling us now is that not only was what she said not true, but this administration knew it wasn't true and they knew it for several days. not only did they know this was a terrorist attack, but, they knew it had been listed officially inside the government as a terrorist attack. that they were searching for the suspects. that it was an attack on u.s. soil, which a u.s.
at the consulate in benghazi. secretary of state hillary clinton was scheduled to testify to congress in a closed intelligence briefing today. it's been suggested the u.s. was warned about that attack in libya three days before it happened. the administration insists they haven't seen intelligence about "significant advanced planning" for that attack. but interestingly the white house is now calling the deadly assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi a terrorist attack for the first time. and it happened on the anniversary of 9/11. fancy that. u.s. relations with israel at least on the surface appear to be getting much worse as president obama continues to say he doesn't have time to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. iran continues to march toward nuclear weapons. syria continues to murder its own people. it all suddenly feels much worse than it has for some time. here's the question, how satisfied are you with u.s. policy in the middle east? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile. post a comment. or go to our post on "the situation room" facebook page. wolf. >> jack, thank you. >>> meanw
of two weeks now. that is what happened in benghazi? why was the message coming out of the administration so muddled at best and misleading at worse? when did they know that it was a terrorist attack? why won't the president actually use the term terrorist attack? well, yesterday there was a major break through and one agency came out and took responsibility. >> in fact, it was james clapper's office, the director of national intelligent basically trying to take the onus off the white house by saying hey it was the intelligence community's fault and said, this quote: in the immediate aftermath there was information that led us to assess that the attack began spontaneously following protests earlier that day in cairo. we provided that initial assessment to the executive branch officials and members of congress who used that information to discuss the attack publicly and provide updates as they became available. through the our investigation we continued to emphasize that our information was preliminary and evolving. >> we were waiting for someone like james clapper or tom donilin to weigh
on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. american violence is beginning to show signs of slowing, but tensions remain high. the state department is evacuating all family members and non-u.s. government personnel from tunisia and the sudan. we have a reporter on the ground in tunisia. >> reporter: shannon, no wonder the state department is concerned. we are back from the area around the u.s. embassy compound here in tunis. we scpaw heard amazing things. today, the compound is secure, tukneesian military very much present. but we are told they were nowhere to be found during key moments on friday, as protesters scaled the wall, mashed up the place before they were driven out. more shocking, is what we saw next door at the american school, that's a k-12, where over 600 kids of foreign parent, including 100 american children. take a look. at noon on friday, the playground at this tukneesian school would have been filled with young kids, some of them american. then the administrators got word that a violent protest was happening across the street at the u.s. embassy and the protesters could be comi
in the consulate in benghazi in eastern libya, there is a cross border aspect to this story that is making right now in tunis. and another aspect of the story tunisia, like other countries are being hard-hit by the united states to stop the radicalism we see here in wake of the arab spring. they told me they did not see the tunisia step between the protests of the islamist and protestors the other friday that did knowledge damage to the u.s. embassy, and its compound and a school nearby where about a hundred american kids were staying until about two hours before the protest. there with us a demand coming from the americans that the tunisia act against these radicals. and there was a taunt in that too. tunisia looking to america to fork over half a billion dollars in needed money over the next year to payoff loans in this economy. there is a bit of a taunt there too by the united states that, hey you come through there and then maybe we can come through with this. back to the breaking news, we'll get a hard confirm when we get our crew on the ground seeing this. about a thousand security surroun
by military and military police. all this started earlier in the weekend in the eastern city of benghazi. where we saw the public rise up and ransack and storm a compound of another militant group there. they say they have had enough. following the attack, the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in the city and a string of other incidents associated with these militants. analysts i speak to are a little bit skeptical they think it might be a tactical retreat for the militants but certainly a move in the right direction. martha: could be. how does all this impact the fbi investigation going on there into the death of ambassador stevens and three other americans? >> reporter: martha, the word we're getting on the ground from benghazi it is calm. authorities are more in control. that is a good thing. the word also been getting on the ground here that the fb i-team sent to this country to investigate the crime has been hampered, maybe even blocked from the benghazi situation and the crime scene there. so that could help. overall, frankly also the public is going after the very militant group
investigators have not set foot in the ruins of the american consulate of benghazi, libya. tonight, we're the first it tell you why. the likely reason and from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not.
that terrorists clearly planned the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that killed ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. leon panetta says there are still many unanswered questions. >> as to who was involved, were specific groups involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> meanwhile the state department says it is removing staff from the embassy in tripoli due to security concerns. >>> the man behind the innocence of muslims, that film that sparked outrage in the muslim world, is in jail this morning in los angeles. nakoula basseley nakoula is being held on alleged parole violations. court records show he used at least 17 fake names, including one he used while making the film. in addition an actress in that movie is suing nakoula for copy right violation. >>> president obama is expected to pick up a phone and place a call to israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu today. this will be the first time the two leaders have spoken since the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. netanyahu has been pressuring the president
official has been killed in an attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. we're just getting this information coming in. we know there was also an attack on the u.s. embassy today. this, the 11th anniversary of 9/11 on the u.s. embassy and cairo, as well. erin burnett "outfront" will have moch much more at the top of the hour. >>> few politicians are more closely associated with 9/11 than rudy guiliani. after the attacks, the former new york city mayor became known as america's mayor as he helped lead the nation forward. you've described 9/11 as both the worst day and the best day. explain why you said that. >> the worst day, because it was the worst attack, domestic attack in the history of my c country, or you have to go back to the revolution and the war of 1812 and civil war to look for similar kinds of things. certainly, new york city. and at the same time, it was a day of more heroism, more patriotic fervor, more assistance, more charitable action and activity than i ever saw, ever, in my life. i never saw this kind of desire to want the
of a dictator for the tyranny of a mob. there is no dignity in that. the people of benghazi sent this message loudly and clearly on friday when they forcefully rejected the extremists many their midst and reclaimed the honor and dignity of a courageous city. >>> we want to bring in our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty to talk a little bit about this, and honestly, jill, there is a different tone to these meetings now after you see these anti-american draegs across the middle east. i know that the secretary, she had a chance to meet with the president of pakistan. do we know anything about what came of that because there were some pretty significant protests over the weekend out of pakistan. >> you know, suzanne, this issue event video really is kind of overshadowing a lot of what's going on. it's not just the video. it's what happens to these arab spring countries now that they've gone through a year, year and a half of being free and moving toward democracy. it's a very rocky road. i was just saying that the sound that came from the president. he said one or two insane people sho
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)